The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry at Emory University

Fellowships

Current Fellows
President's Humanities Fellow | Senior | Post-Doctoral | Poetics
Graduate Dissertation Completion  
Honors Undergraduate |  SIRE Undergraduate
Distinguished Visiting Professorship | VW Foundation Fellowship Program
Summer Research Fellows | Alumni of the Center | Fellow Publications


SIRE UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP APPLICATION
Submission Deadline: Monday, August 25, 2014
           

Current Fellows 2014-2015

PRESIDENT’S FELLOWSHIP IN THE HUMANITIES
Tenured Members of the Emory Faculty

Henry BayerleHenry Bayerle is Associate Professor of Classics at Oxford College of Emory University, where he has taught since 2006.  He earned a B.A. in Classics at Brown University, an M.A. in French from Indiana University, and a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Harvard University.  His research focuses on the reception of the Greek and Roman classics in European literature, especially in medieval Italy and France.  He has published on the medieval Ars memoriae, Ovid and medieval French Mélusine romances, and several Latin works of medieval Italy.  He is also actively interested in second language acquisition research and has published on Latin language pedagogy.  At the Fox Center he will work on a Latin edition and English translation of the Chronicon Novaliciense, an 11th-century chronicle composed at the Piedmontese abbey of Novalesa. 

SENIOR FELLOWS
Tenured Members of the Emory Faculty

BoundsElizabeth M. Bounds is Associate Professor of Christian Ethics at the Candler School of Theology and the Graduate Division of Religion, where she has taught since 1997.  Besides publishing Coming Together/Coming Apart: Religion, Modernity, and Community, she has authored several essays in edited volumes and is a co-editor of Welfare Policy: Feminist Critiques and Justice in the Making: Feminist Social Ethics. The core of her research, teaching, and scholarship focuses on moral and Christian theological responses in contexts of conflict and violence, whether in the US prison system, in ordinary congregational life, or in post-conflict situations such as Liberia.  While at the Fox Center, she is writing a book on the ethics of responsibility and redemption as a restorative approach to incarceration, which is based both on research on religion in the US prison system and on teaching in the Georgia prison system.

MeltonJames V.H. Melton, Professor of History, joined the Emory faculty in 1987.  His primary area of interest is early modern Europe, with a special focus on Enlightenment culture, Central Europe, and most recently the Atlantic World.  His Religion, Community, and Slavery on the Southern Colonial Frontier will appear with Cambridge University Press in 2015.  His previous books include The Rise of the Public in Enlightenment Europe (2001) and Absolutism and the Eighteenth-Century Origins of Compulsory Schooling (1988).  At the Fox Center he will be writing a book on Lorenzo Da Ponte (1749-1838), best known today as Mozart's librettist, and the trans-European and trans-Atlantic migration of musical culture in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

oelerKarla Oeler is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies and Core Faculty in the Department of Comparative Literature.  She is the author of A Grammar of Murder:  Violent Scenes and Film Form (2009) and several articles on literature and film, including works by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Jean-Luc Godard, Sergei Parajanov, Jean Renoir, and André Bazin.  At the Fox Center she will be working on a book about the paradoxical, and intimate, relationship between film and thinking; it focuses on the filmic adaptation of literary forms designed to show private thoughts, or inner speech (interior monologue, free indirect discourse, lyric, soliloquy, the diary).

RoyDeboleena Roy is Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology at Emory University.  She received her Ph.D. in reproductive neuroendocrinology and molecular biology from the Institute of Medical Science at the University of Toronto. In her doctoral work, she examined the effects of estrogen and melatonin on the gene expression and cell signaling mechanisms in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons of the hypothalamus.  Her current areas of interest include feminist science and technology studies, philosophy of science, neuroethics, molecular biology, and reproductive justice movements.  She has published her work in journals such as Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy; American Journal of Bioethics; Neuroethics; Australian Feminist Studies; Rhizomes: Cultural Studies of Emerging Knowledge; Endocrinology; Neuroendocrinology; and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Her research and scholarship attempts to make a shift from feminist critiques of science to the creation of feminist practices that can contribute to scientific inquiry in the lab. 

SkibellJoseph Skibell, a professor of English and Creative Writing, is the author of three novels. A Blessing on the Moon received the Rosenthal Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. The English Disease received the Jesse H. Jones Award from the Texas Institute of Letters, and A Curable Romantic, the Sami Rohr Award in Jewish Literature. His short stories and essays have appeared in Story, Tikkun, The New York Times, and Poets & Writers, among other periodicals, and he has written or translated essays for three books of photographs: Loli Kantor’s There was a Forest, Neil Folberg’s The Serpent’s Chronicle, and Fred Stein: Paris New York. A recipient of a Halls Fellowship, a Michener Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, Skibell was inducted into the Sami Rohr Literary Institute in 2011.  He is the director of the Richard Ellmann Lectures in Modern Literature. A fourth book, Six Memos from the Fifth Millennium, a mytho-poetic meditation on the stories in the Talmud, is awaiting publication, and he has completed a sixth book, a collection of true stories called My Father’s Guitar & Other Imaginary Things. He plans to work on a new novel at the Fox Center.

N.E.H. POSTDOCTORAL FELLOW IN POETICS

PerlowSeth Perlow (Ph.D., Cornell University) is an Assistant Professor of English at Oklahoma State University. He specializes in twentieth-century and contemporary American literature, poetry and poetics, and media theory. He edited Gertrude Stein’s Tender Buttons: The Corrected Centennial Edition (City Lights, 2014). His current project, The Poem Electric: Technology and Uncritical Thinking in American Verse Cultures, traces a lineage of experimentalists for whom electronics do not work as “information technologies” but offer alternatives to rationalism. Bringing the poetry of Susan Howe, Frank O’Hara, Amiri Baraka, and others into conversation with theories and histories of electronic media, this study challenges the privilege of information in the digital humanities by arguing that the electrification of American poetry and literary scholarship has enabled uncritical thinking.
                                               
                                              POST-DOCTORAL FELLOWS
Bell
Jeremy Bell (Ph.D., DePaul University) specializes in Ancient Philosophy with a focus on the relationship between practices of care and systems of governance. His first book (co-edited with Michael Naas) is a collected volume entitled Plato's Animals (Indiana University Press, 2015). This book analyzes what are often taken to be purely literary or rhetorical devices—the examples, analogies, or metaphors of animals in the dialogues—in order to develop Plato’s most philosophical ideas. While at the Fox Center, Dr. Bell will be working on a book manuscript, entitled Plato's Politics of Care. This project argues that Plato's philosophy is structured around the concept of care (epimeleia) and that this concept provides a means by which Plato analyzes the often tense relationship between ethics and politics.

Bryan William Bryan (Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University) is an environmental historian, and his work provides a historical perspective on the origins of sustainable development in the United States. At the Fox Center, he will be completing his current book manuscript, entitled Nature and the New South: Competing Visions of Resource Use in a Developing Region, 1865-1929. This manuscript uses the lens of environmental history to consider how conflicts over the control and use of natural resources shaped attempts to rebuild the economy of the American South in the wake of the Civil War. By placing the South within the broader American conservation movement, this study sheds light on early attempts to determine what enterprises were the most sustainable, and it traces how these ideas shaped economic development in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century United States.

WrightAmanda S. Wright (Ph.D., University of Kansas) is Assistant Professor at the University of South Carolina. Her research and teaching touch on themes of modernity in Asian art, with a focus on avant-garde painting in early twentieth-century China. While at Emory, she will finish her book manuscript, Pretty as a Picture: Qiu Ti and Women Artists of the Republican Period. Centering on interrelated questions of modernist theory, feminism, the popular press, and personal identity, this project explores the role of Chinese women artists in the art community and larger society during the Republican period (1911-1949).    

            GRADUATE DISSERTATION COMPLETION FELLOWS
   The Laney Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
    Emory University

MarshallJill Marshall (Religion) is completing her dissertation, “Women Praying and Prophesying: Gender and Inspired Speech in First Corinthians.” This project asks: In ancient Mediterranean settings, was prophecy viewed and received differently when a man or a woman spoke? To answer this question, she analyzes Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians within its broader socio-cultural and literary contexts. In this letter, Paul expresses tension about women praying or prophesying in the early Christian assembly. Marshall’s work examines literary and archaeological evidence for conventions about women’s public speech, religious authority and characterizations of female prophets, and religious spaces and activities in Roman Corinth.

ScheyTaylor Schey (Comparative Literature) is completing his dissertation, “Romantic Junctions: Skepticism, Politics, Aesthetics.” This project explores the afterlife of David Hume’s epistemological skepticism in the political aesthetics, polemics, and poetics of British Romanticism, while challenging the assumption that the conclusions of eighteenth-century empiricism were largely a source of anxiety and crisis for Romantic writers. Situating Hume’s philosophical treatment of the concepts of custom, analogy, and necessity in relation to the literary and theoretical writings of Edmund Burke, William Wordsworth, and Percy Bysshe Shelley, Schey recasts contemporary debates on the consequences of skepticism and argues for a new way of apprehending the junction of politics and aesthetics in the Romantic era.

SciontiAndrea Scionti (History) is completing his dissertation: "Not our Kind of Anti-Communists: Americans and the Congress for Cultural Freedom in France and Italy, 1950-1967." His project looks at the cultural Cold War in Western Europe as a lens to explore the limits of U.S. influence and persuasion within the American "empire by invitation." U.S. policymakers and intellectuals tried to further American interests and a “hegemonic discourse” through the Congress for Cultural Freedom, an organization created to promote and coordinate anti-Communist intellectuals with covert funding from the CIA. Far from being puppets or unwitting assets, French and Italian intellectuals repeatedly challenged and frustrated American expectations, and influenced the nature of America's cultural Cold War. 

President's Humanities Fellows Program

The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry announces an annual Fellowship available to tenured members of the Emory University faculty in the professional schools and Oxford College for an academic year of study and residence in the Center.  The purpose of the FCHI President’s Humanities Fellows Program is to stimulate and support humanistic research by providing faculty with the necessary time, space, and other resources.

Senior Fellows Program

The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry announces up to four annual internal Fellowships available to tenured members of the Emory University faculty for an academic year of study and residence in the Center.  FCHI Senior Fellows will be released from their University teaching and service commitments for the academic year, in addition to receiving a research budget from the Center.

Post-Doctoral Fellows Program

The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry announces up to three annual Post-Doctoral Fellowships for an academic year of study, teaching, and residence in the Center.  The purpose of the FCHI Post-Doctoral Fellows Program is to stimulate and support humanistic research by providing scholars in early stages of their careers with the necessary time, space, and other resources.  In addition, the Program was created to allow the Emory community access to a range of humanistic work by visiting scholars from other institutions.

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Poetics

The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry announces a Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Poetics, funded by a Challenge Grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, for an academic year of study, teaching, and residence in the Center.  Please note that Post-Doctoral Fellows, who must have the Ph.D.in hand before submission of their applications, are awarded to those who have held the Ph.D. for no more than six years before receiving the fellowship.         

Dissertation Completion Fellows Program

The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry announces its annual Dissertation Completion Fellowships for students enrolled in the Laney Graduate School of Emory University for an academic year of residence in the Center to finish their dissertations.  The purpose of the FCHI Dissertation Completion Fellowship Program is to support timely completion of Ph.D. work; it is designed for students whose work is far enough advanced so that completion and final approval of the dissertation during the academic year can be assured.

Humanities Honors Fellowship

The Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, with the Emory College Honors Program, will offer up to four undergraduate fellowships to support work on completing projects for one semester.

SIRE Fellowship

SIRE Grants support independent research and scholarly projects by undergraduate students. In partnership with Emory College of Arts and Sciences, these fellowships for students in the humanities who may not need research funds, will provide office space at the FCHI and the opportunity to participate in a vibrant humanities research community of Emory faculty, graduate students, and visiting scholars for the fall semester.  
APPLICATION
Fox Center Undergraduate Blog

Distinguished Visiting Professorship

In alternate years, the Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry brings to Emory an eminent humanities scholar with an international reputation in interdisciplinary research for a semester in residence in a humanities department or program as a FCHI Fellow, to teach, do research, present public lectures and discussions, and participate in the intellectual life of the Center.

VW Foundation Fellowship Program

In Spring 2014, the Fox Center became partner institution with the Volkswagen Foundation's Post-doctoral Fellowships in the Humanities at Universities and Research Institutes in the U.S. and Germany.  Led by Professor Astrid Eckert from Emory’s Department of History, the FCHI applied and was granted partner institution status.  The program funds up to 12 post-doctoral Fellows from German institutions who will spend an academic year concentrating on research, and the FCHI is now one of the options they may choose. Please click here for more information.

Summer Research Fellows

Each summer Emory University’s Robert W. Woodruff Library, in partnership with the Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, offers short-term fellowships to visiting scholars to support scholarly use of the Library’s research collections.
More info...

Fellow Publications

2014:


Tissol

Ovid: Epistulae ex Ponto Book I (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)
Garth Tissol


Caplan
Rhyme's Challenge: Hip Hop, Poetry, and
Contemporary Rhyming Culture
David Caplan

 


2013:


Stolley

Domesticating Empire: Enlightenment in Spanish America
Karen Stolley



Hanhardt


Safe Space: Gay Neighborhood History and the
Politics of Violence

Christina B. Hanhardt


kahan


Celibacies: American Modernism and Sexual Life

Benjamin Kahan



RThomas


Architecture and Statecraft: Charles of Bourbon's Naples, 1734-1759 (Buildings, Landscapes, and Societies)

Robin L. Thomas


JMiller


Republics at War, 1776-1840: Revolutions, Conflicts, and Geopolitics in Europe and the Atlantic World (War, Culture and Society, 1750-1850)

Judith A. Miller



Jensen

Nietzsche's Philosophy of History
Anthony K. Jensen





CWickham


The Muslim Brotherhood: Evolution of an Islamist Movement

Carrie Rosefsky Wickham




NSlater

Euripides: Alcestis (Companions to Greek and Roman Tragedy)
Niall W. Slater



LoichotBookCover

The Tropics Bite Back: Culinary Coups in Caribbean Literature
Valérie Loichot

 


LavinBookCover

Eating Anxiety: The Perils of Food Politics
Chad Lavin

 

 

MulhollandBookCover


Sounding Imperial: Poetic Voice and the Politics of Empire, 1730-1820
James Mulholland

 



rule


Romantic Revisions in Novels from the Americas (Comparative Cultural Studies)

Lauren Maxwell Rule

 

 

JLesser
Immigration, Ethnicity, and National Identity in Brazil, 1808 to the Present (New Approaches to the Americas)

Jeffrey Lesser



2012:

Dzon
The Christ Child in Medieval Culture: Alpha es et O!

Mary Dzon




American Showman: Samuel 'Roxy' Rothafel and the Birth of the Entertainment Industry, 1908-1935 (Film and Culture) Cover

American Showman: Samuel "Roxy" Rothafel and the Birth of the Entertainment Industry, 1908-1935 (Film and Culture)
Ross Melnick



2011:

SitterThe Cambridge Introduction to Eighteenth-Century Poetry
John Sitter




Front Cover
Reconsidering Biography: Contexts, Controversies, and Sir John Hawkin's Life of Johnson
Martine W. Brownley


PozorskiRoth and Trauma: The Problem of History in the Later Works (1995-2010)
Aimee L. Pozorski




The Year of the Lash: Free People of Color in Cuba and the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World (Early American Places) CoverThe Year of the Lash: Free People of Color in Cuba and the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World (Early American Places)
Michele Reid-Vazquez



The Jaguar Within
Shamanic Trance in Ancient Central and South American Art (Linda Schele Series in Maya and Pre-Columbian Studies
)
                  Rebecca R. Stone




LesserJournal2011

Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies
Jeffrey Lesser and Raanan Rein, Guest Editors



2010:

Damned Notions of Liberty: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico, 1640-1769 (Dialogos)

Damned Notions of Liberty: Slavery, Culture, and Power in Colonial Mexico 1640-1769
Frank T. Proctor III


LeMon

Yahweh's Winged Form in the Psalms
Joel M. LeMon



Sanders

A Black Soldier's Story
Mark A. Sanders


Caplan
In the World He Created According to His Will
David Caplan


Rein

Argentine Jews or Jewish Argentines?: Essays on Ethnicity, Identity, and Diaspora. (Jewish Identities in a Changing World)
Raanan Rein



BrenBookCover

The Greengrocer and His TV: The Culture of Communism After the 1968 Prague Spring
Paulina Bren




CUDA

The Passions of Modernism: Eliot, Yeats, Woolf, and Mann
Anthony Cuda



Sparks

The Doctor in the Victorian Novel
Tabitha Sparks

 


2009:

Basil of CaesareaBasil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, and the Transformation of Divine Simplicity
Andrew Radde-Gallwitz



Image of Cover

Islamism: Contested Perspectives on Political Islam
Richard Martin


Desert Voices: Bedouin Women's Poetry in Saudi Arabia (Library of Modern Middle East Studies)

Desert Voices: Bedouin Women's Poetry in Saudi Arabia
Moneera Al-Ghadeer



Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America  
Harvey Klehr  




Go to 'A Social and Cultural History of Early Modern France' page

A Social and Cultural History of Early Modern France
William Beik




GarlandBook

Staring: How We Look
Rosemarie Garland-Thomson

 


Go to 'The Scene of Harlem Cabaret: Race, Sexuality, Performance' page

The Scene of Harlem Cabaret: Race, Sexuality, Performance
Shane Vogel



PriceBook

Judge Richard S. Arnold: A Legacy of Justice on the Federal Bench
Polly J. Price

 

 

Woodard

A Place in Politics: São Paulo, Brazil, from Seigneurial Republicanism to Regionalist Revolt
James P. Woodard


Go to 'Screening a Lynching: The Leo Frank Case on Film and Television' page

Screening a Lynching: The Leo Frank Case on Film and Television
Matthew H. Bernstein




SwensonBookCover
Imagining Selves: Essays in Honor of Patricia Meyer Spacks
Rivka Swenson & Elise Lauterbach




2008:

Literary Historicity: Literature and Historical Experience in Eighteenth-Century Britain
Ruth Mack

The Bhagavad Gita
Anonymous- Author
Laurie L. Patton - Translator / Introduction and Notes

Democracy's Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent
 
Ernest Freeberg
Winner of the 2008 David J. Langum, Sr. Prize in American Legal History
Los Angeles Times 2008 Book Prize Finalist in Biography

The Politics of Responsibility
Chad Lavin

Surrealism and the Art of Crime
Jonathan P. Eburne

La Diaspora Cubana en Mexico: Terceros Espacios Y Miradas Excentricas
Tanya N. Weimer

 

 

 


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The Bill and Carol Fox Center for Humanistic Inquiry, Emory University
1635 North Decatur Rd, Atlanta, GA 30322
Phone: 404.727.6424 • Fax: 404.727.1669 • FoxCenter@emory.edu